Excerpt from the book.

Oliver Kane

Story in the Songs


Description of a Rebel (1798)



He is of the middle size, between twenty and thirty years of age with a dark complection, Marked with the smallpox, and black or brown short hair inclined to a curl.
His face rather round and pale, He wore a round hat, black silk kerchief about his neck, an outside grey cloth surtout coat and large black cape,
A brown corduroy breeches, and white thread or cotton stockings,He walks with his hands in his pockets singing Irish Rebel songs.
He rode out of the country on a small sorrel horse. . . letter from W. Billing, Wicklow, describing Captain Doorly, State paper Office,620/40/36).




Military music, (1691)



" From Bandon in the County of Cork we have a late account, That Lieutenant Arthur Bernard, with twenty Militia Dragoons of Captain Wade,s Troop, which were posted at Dunmanway,
A frontier of that County, accompanied with an Ensign and 18 Foot of the army, advanced in to the Enemies Quaters,and took prey of five hundred sheep, fifty Cows, and thirty Garrans,
Whereupon the Irish, Rais'd the cry, so that seven companies of O ' Donovans Regiment got together, and Detach 120 of their party to fall upon our Men:
They came on in good order, with their Bagpipe playing, and fired briskly at our men, who received their Shot, and then Charged and Cried They run They run,as indeed they did,
The Dragoons pursued and kill'd ten, and took one prisoner, and our men brought off their Prey in view of the enemy:
Some part of the prey was given to Victual the Garrison, amid the rest was divided amongst those that took it to their " satisfaction" .
"dublin intelligence" 20/27 January 1691



A Brief St Patrick.


Colmcille is said to have been the first person to collect the miracles of Patrick,
Tirechan says he used a book about Patrick belonging to Bishop Ultan as one of his sources.
From those two accounts and other traditions and later accounts as well we can sift out some other information about Patrick,
that his full name was, Magonus Sucatus Patricius, and that his mother was called Concessa, that he studied at Auxerre in Gaul, attracted to this place by the fame of its Bishop,Germanus, the man who had been sent as papal legate to Britain about the Pelagian heresy in that country.
His place of captivity in Ireland is named ,Sliab Mis (Slemish) , Co Antrim, and his master a druid or learned man called Miliuc maccu Boin,


The wood of Volcut has been identified with a site near Killala Co Mayo, though what Patrick had to do in particular with this place remains unknown, The objections to Patrick being made Bishops were over-come, but it appears he always had to face a current of opposition,
his lack of learning,
perhaps the very success of his mission were being held against him, Patrick quite definitely represents himself as the apostle of Ireland,
Both his (" confession and his letter ") describe a pagan country into which Patrick brings the faith, Baptises many thousands,
He ordains and organises a native clergy, It was dangerous work at times, Patrick mentions twelve dangers in which my life was at stake--not to mention numerous plots, that no-one should say Patrick was preaching the gospel for gain, he gave back, often to the offence of the donors, all gifts,
He refused money for Baptisms, or from those he ordained priests,








From the song,


The Union.




How trive we by the Union ?
Look round our native land,
In ruined trade and wealth decayed,
See slavery,s surest brand,
Our glory as a nation gone ;
Our substance drained away ;
A wretched province trampled on,
Is all we,ve left to-day,
Then curse me with the Union,
That juggle foul and base,
The baneful root that bore such fruit,
Of ruin and disgrace,

And shall it last this Union,
To grind and waste us so ?
O,er hill and lea, from sea to sea,
All Ireland thunders, no !
Eight million necks are stiff to bow,
We know our might as men ;
We conqured once before, and now,
We,ll conquer once again,
And rend the cursed Union,
And fling it to the wind,
And Ireland,s laws, in Irelands cause,
Alone our hearts shall bind .